CATO Institute Report – Cost and Consequences of Gun Control

 

I’ve excerpted some of the highlights of the paper.

“This paper will scrutinize the three most common gun-control ideas that have been put forward in recent years: universal background checks, a ban on high-capacity magazines, and a ban on assault weapons. These proposals are misguided and will not prevent the crimes that typically prompt officials to make pleas for more gun control.

More Background Checks

In 2013, the FBI conducted more than 21 million background checks for firearm purchases. Dylann Roof, the racist who attacked the churchgoers in Charleston, had previously been arrested, and he had admitted to law enforcement officers that he was a user of methamphetamine. That was sufficient, under the federal Gun Control Act of 1968, to prohibit him from owning guns, because the statute bans gun ownership by illegal drug users. However, as the FBI later admitted, the bureau failed to properly enter into its database the prohibiting information that had been provided by local law enforcement.

Professor James Alan Fox of Northeastern University, who studies mass shootings, explains that “mass killers are determined, deliberate and dead-set on murder. They plan methodically to execute their victims, finding the means no matter what laws or other impediments the state attempts to place in their way. To them, the will to kill cannot be denied.”

Gun-control advocates often claim that 40 percent of annual firearms sales take place today without background checks. The Washington Post “fact-checker” has debunked that claim, giving it “Three Pinocchios.” The Post noted that the survey data used for the study on which the 40 percent claim is based are more than two decades old, which means they were collected prior to the National Instant Criminal Background Check System becoming operational in 1998, and the survey only polled 251 people

High Capacity Magazines

Why might someone need a factory-standard 17-round magazine for a common 9mm handgun? As noted, standard-capacity magazines can be very useful for self-defense. This is especially true if a defender faces multiple attackers, an attacker is wearing heavy clothing or body armor, an attacker who is turbo-charged by methamphetamine or cocaine, or an attacker who poses an active threat from behind cover. In stressful circumstances, police as well as civilians often miss when firing a handgun even at close range, so having the extra rounds can be crucial.

Although one can quickly change magazines, persons being attacked by criminals will typically prefer not to spend even a few seconds for a magazine change. The stress of being attacked usually impedes fine motor skills, making it much more difficult to insert the magazine. The criminal has the element of surprise, and can bring several guns, or lots of magazines, whereas the victim will usually have on hand, at most, a single defensive gun with only as much ammunition as is in that gun. This gives the advantage to the criminal.

Advocates of a ban on standard-capacity magazines assert that while the attacker is changing the magazine, an intended victim might be able to subdue him — yet they cannot point to a single instance where this actually happened. At Newtown, the criminal changed magazines seven times and no one escaped, but when his rifle jammed, people did escape. Similarly, in the Luby’s cafeteria murders (24 dead), the perpetrator replaced magazines multiple times. In the Virginia Tech murders (32 dead), the perpetrator changed magazines 17 times.

Assault Weapons

(What the heck even is that?)

– The UK homicide rate tends to fluctuate between one and two per 100,000 population. The U.S. homicide rate is 4.7 (as of 2011). The difference is not entirely due to guns, since the non-gun U.S. homicide rate is consistently higher than the UK total homicide rate.

– In other categories of major violent crime, the UK is generally worse than the United States. In 2010, the assault rate per 100,000 population was 250.9 in the United States; 664.4 in England and Wales; 1449.7 in Scotland; and 80.6 in Northern Ireland.

– Burglary rates were: United States 695.9; England and Wales, 946.1; Northern Ireland, 658.7; and Scotland, 479.1. So the overall UK burglary rate is significantly worse

– In the United States, only a fairly small percentage of home burglaries take place when the occupants are home, but in Great Britain, about 59 percent do.94 In surveys, American burglars say that they avoid occupied homes because of the risk of getting shot.

http://www.cato.org/publications/policy-analysis/costs-consequences-gun-control#full

Have a Great Day!

Lubimur

Back To it Tuesday

Cubicle Prison Workout 5/30/2017

Just back to the cube after a 5 day weekend; lots to catch up on. Either Saturday or Sunday, I can’t remember which, I went to bed with my elbow area screaming in agony. I don’t know if I injured myself, or just worked some muscle(s) to the extreme. I do know how it happened: chambering rounds in my new toy. The charging handle on that thing feels like a hydraulic press. The pain was so bad that I had trouble fallen asleep.

Hanging Stretch (toe toucher stretch)

Glute Flex – 30 reps

Torso Mobility Drill – Trunk Twiss, Hip Circles, Rib Cage side to sides (from dance class), Hip side to side – 30 each

Plank – 2 min

Calf stretch / Calf raise (on floor) – 35 left leg, 38 right leg

Glute Bridge on Exerball – 50

Scissor Lunge – 25/side, Great form

Stiff Leg Deadlift – 50

Pushup – 40 – Failure at top of last rep, couldn’t even attempt 41

– Great form, paused for 1 breath at top of movement from reps 30-40

– Full ROM (nose touching ground)

Man, just finished pushup and my chest feels soooo pumped! No elbow issues.

Neck Mobility

Scapular Dips – 40, feet on footrest (elevated off of floor, legs straight)

Rotating Side Plank with step-through – 10

Isometric chest press – upper pec – 1 min

Delt raise w/Purple band – 27 Failure

– Perfect form, kept arms completely straight

Isometric Chest Squeeze – lower pec – 30 seconds, max intensity

Delt Raise Black Band – 12 total Failure!

– Good form

Have a Great Day!

Lubimûr

Fridge Knowledge – Beef Stock and Smoked Turkey

Here’s the question: How long does Beef Stock / Bone Broth /Bone Soup stay good in the fridge?

Well, I have some stock that I made myself from pastured / grass fed cows. I reduced it down to the consistency of jelly (not jello, it was definitely firmer than that), removed the fat cap, put it in a mason jar and put it in the refrigerator. Well actually I put some in the fridge and some in the freezer. The jar in question went into the freezer, but has now been in the refrigerator for 3 weeks.

I ate the last of it today, and it seemed fine. It didn’t smell bad and it tasted like it should. If I don’t post anything regarding getting sick from it, then it was fine. If I do get sick, I will post my results.

Verdict: if the bone soup is gelatinous, and kept cool at the back of the fridge, then 3 weeks should be safe.

Turkey

Next up is the Thanksgiving Turkey. I brined it for 10 hours, then smoked it for about 14-15 hours. I think it hit 165 degrees, but can’t exactly remember. The hip sockets were still a bit underdone, one was red the other almost slightly raw. The breast was done all the way to the breast bone, and the wings were very much done.

Anyway, the dark meat I finished off today with the bone soup, some of the breast meat is still in the fridge. It was cooked last Wednesday night and came out of the smoker on Thursday about 12:30 PM. It was wrapped and in cooler until we ate at about 2:30, then it sat out until I got home and put it in the fridge about 8:00 PM. That was roughly 8 days ago (7.5 days technically).

It smelled good and tasted delicious.

Verdict: a smoked turkey can go 8 days no problem at all.

Please note that I am NOT a doctor, a nutritionist, dietician, or particularly smart person. These are the biohacks of a madman.

Have a Great Day!

Lubimûr

A Lot of Preps are Like Fire Insurance

You may never need them – you hope you’ll never need them – but you buy them anyway just in case; because the outcome if you should need them and don’t have them is just so bleak.

I just finished watching “end Day” on Netflix. It made me think not so much about teotwawki, but the preps I have in place “just in case”. Now that I have been working toward resilience for quite some time now, the initial overreaction has passed. Point in case, I am more prepared for a pandemic than I am for an extended job loss. Which do you suppose is more likely?

Having said that, I do realize that, even though the former is far less likely, it is easier to prepare for because there are so many “one and done” things you can do to prepare for them; and unlike the latter, once the former strikes it may be too late to do anything more than what you have already done to mitigate the risk.

Back to my point, I did realize there are some things which may be necessary that I have not yet added to my preps. Two come to mind immediately: two wind up time keeping devices (don’t think it really matters whether they are watches or clocks), and goggles to accompany my air filter masks. The first we need so that we can coordinate with our peeps (family members, tribe, band, whatever) and know that someone either is where they are supposed to be when they are supposed to be there, or they’re not. The second is because some bugs could get in if someone sneezes and we catch it in the face. In the movie, one of the scenarios was a pandemic, and the rescue workers were wearing the hazmat suits and had eye protection.  That’s when I asked myself “shouldn’t I have some eye protection as well as my filter masks”?

I wear glasses so I am going to get some prescription sports goggles to fit that bill.  I suppose my eye protection that I use with the table saw over my glasses would work, but that is so cumbersome and inefficient, and since I can get a pair of sports goggles for $30…

In another scenario a husband and wife are not together when news of a catastrophe hits, one is at home and she starts loading up the minivan with water, food, etc, and the husband is out and about with their kid.  I thought, “How will she know whether know whether to keep waiting or cut and run?  Do they have a rendezvous point?”  What if you do link up – or start out together – and then have to split up, how would we know when to worry, or bug out alone?

The wind up watches won’t really be necessary as long as there is electricity, since we can charge and use our phones. Even if we can no longer sync to a network so our time of day is accurate, we can still use the timer or stopwatch function (app) on our phones. The only two times I can think of where this would be undoable is an EMF or we are away from any way to recharge for a few days. Still, something to consider.

OPT OUT

02/01/13

Secede as an individual. Quit supporting the corporate mindset that you so despise and which is stealing your wealth, free time, family time, and quality of life. Disempower the systems that are oppressing you. Empower yourself. Be resilient, not dependant. Without even realizing it we support and enforce our own slavery/oppression. We actively participate in keeping the systems that make us miserable going. We are miserable and we facilitate it. Lead your own life! Don’t get me wrong, I think you should absolutely support those advancing the causes you believe in, but don’t stop there. Use some of that support to make a difference yourself. Think about the kind of person it took to shape and tame this country. You are born of that stock, those were your ancestors. You have that same blood in you.

We need to support things that matter. We need to support things that add value to our lives on the individual (personal) level. We need to support things that will support us.

02/01/13 ACTION

– Bought 5 ounces of silver from the TSPMint which just came online. I didn’t really need more silver at this point, but they are working in conjunction with AOCS and I wanted to show my support for both TSP and AOCS. I want to enable them to keep getting the message out.